Islamists in Power: Views from Within

April 5, 2012 Washington, D.C.
Summary
Islamist parties will have a dominant impact on the outcome of Arab transitions, but there is little understanding in Washington of what that will mean for governing.
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Islamist parties have emerged as the strongest contenders in recent elections in Tunisia, Egypt, and Morocco, and are likely continue to do well in future elections in other countries. It is clear that Islamist parties will have a dominant impact on the outcome of Arab transitions, but there is little understanding in Washington of what that will mean for governing.

On April 5, high-level representatives of Islamist parties from Egypt, Tunisia, Morocco, Jordan, and Libya participated in a one-day conference convened by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Program

  • Opening Remarks

    April 5, 2012 Washington, D.C. Jessica Tuchman Mathews

    It is clear that Islamist parties will have a dominant impact on the outcome of Arab transitions, but there needs to be a clearer understanding in Washington of what that will mean for governing.

     
  • Building New Regimes after the Uprisings

    April 5, 2012 Washington, D.C. Marwan Muasher, Sahbi Atig, Abdul Mawgoud Rageh Dardery, Mustapha Elkhalfi, Nabil Alkofahi

    Following the Arab Spring, Islamist parties in the Arab world face major political challenges in building new regimes.

     
  • Writing a New Constitution

    April 5, 2012 Washington, D.C. Nathan J. Brown, Khaled Al-Qazzaz, Osama Al Saghir, Mohamed Gaair

    In the wake of the Arab Spring, new governments are struggling to determine how constitutions can be drafted to have maximum support and act as an instrument of reconciliation, and how to define the place of Islam and sharia in the new system.

     
  • Islamists in Power and the Obama Administration

    April 5, 2012 Washington, D.C. Marina Ottaway, David Ignatius

    Washington Post columnist David Ignatius spoke on President Obama’s Middle East policy and response to the Arab Awakening.

     
  • Economic Challenges of the Transition

    April 5, 2012 Washington, D.C. Masood Ahmed, Hussein Elkazzaz, Mondher Ben Ayed, Nael Al-Masalha, Abdelhadi Falahat

    As Islamist parties gain power in the Middle East, they must formulate short- and long-term plans to address the present economic crisis and determine the roles of the state, private sector, and international finance institutions in promoting economic development.

     
Source carnegie-mec.org/2012/04/05/islamists-in-power-views-from-within/avdo

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