Maha Yahya

Director
Carnegie Middle East Center

Yahya is director of the Carnegie Middle East Center, where her research focuses on citizenship, pluralism, and social justice in the aftermath of the Arab uprisings.

Maha Yahya is director of the Carnegie Middle East Center, where her work focuses broadly on political violence and identity politics, pluralism, development and social justice after the Arab uprisings, the challenges of citizenship, and the political and socio-economic implications of the migration/refugee crisis.

Prior to joining Carnegie, Yahya led work on Participatory Development and Social Justice at the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (UN-ESCWA). She was previously regional adviser on social and urban policies at UN-ESCWA and spearheaded strategic and inter-sectoral initiatives and policies in the Office of the Executive Secretary which addressed the challenges of democratic transitions in the Arab world. Yahya has also worked with the United Nations Development Program in Lebanon, where she was the director and principal author of The National Human Development Report 2008–2009: Toward a Citizen’s State. She was also the founder and editor of the MIT Electronic Journal of Middle East Studies

Yahya has worked with international organizations and in the private sector as a consultant on projects related to socioeconomic policy analysis, development policies, cultural heritage, poverty reduction, housing and community development, and postconflict reconstruction in various countries including Lebanon, Pakistan, Oman, Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and Iran. She has served on a number of advisory boards including the MIT Enterprise Forum of the Pan Arab Region and the Lebanese Center for Policy Studies.

Yahya  is the author of numerous publications, including most recently Unheard Voices: What Syrian Refugees Need to Return Home (April 2018); The Summer of Our Discontent: Sects and Citizens in Lebanon and Iraq (June 2017); Great Expectations in Tunisia (March 2016); Refugees and the Making of an Arab Regional Disorder (November 2015); Towards Integrated Social Development Policies: A Conceptual Analysis (UN-ESCWA, 2004), co-editor of Secular Publicities: Visual practices and the Transformation of National Publics in the Middle East and South Asia (University of Michigan Press, 2010) and co-author of Promises of Spring: Citizenship and Civic Engagement in Democratic Transitions (UN-ESCWA, 2013). 

 

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  • All Fall Down
    • July 23, 2020

    All Fall Down

    Today, four of the five pillars that had sustained Lebanon are collapsing, creating fears for the future.

  • At a Breaking Point
    • April 30, 2020

    At a Breaking Point

    Lebanon’s politicians know they must save their country from an implosion in order to save themselves.

  • A Storm of Imperfection
    • January 31, 2020

    A Storm of Imperfection

    Lebanon is struggling against simultaneous shocks, and the country is in urgent need of a new social contract.

  • Out With the Old, In With What?
    • December 16, 2019

    Out With the Old, In With What?

    More than protests, Lebanon today is witnessing a profound social revolution.

  • Lebanon Needs a Cabinet, Now
    • November 22, 2019

    Lebanon Needs a Cabinet, Now

    The Lebanese want to take the reins of their own future, but does the political elite get it?

  • Into the Fire
    • September 11, 2019

    Into the Fire

    Countries are forcibly sending Syrians back home, though their country remains highly insecure.

  • Double Trouble
    • September 04, 2019

    Double Trouble

    Lebanon is increasingly finding itself in the crosshairs of the United States’ and Israel’s efforts to contain Iran.

  • Washington Designates Three Hezbollah Officials
    • July 11, 2019

    Washington Designates Three Hezbollah Officials

    Spot analysis from Carnegie scholars on events relating to the Middle East and North Africa

  • Back to the Chain Gang
    • July 08, 2019

    Back to the Chain Gang

    Lebanon is increasingly mistreating its Syrian refugees, even sending some home to face a terrible fate.

  • The War After the War
    • September 14, 2018

    The War After the War

    Post-conflict reconstruction is inherently political, involving a struggle for power and influence.

Education

PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
PhD, Architectural Association School of Architecture

Languages
  • Arabic
  • English
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